How Marie Kondo Can Help You Meet Your Financial Goals

The new Netflix series, Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, is getting rave reviews. Marie Kondo is the best selling author of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. The Netflix series brings Kondo into American family homes, where she teaches them the fundamentals of organizing their stuff.

Organizing your stuff and managing your finances have much in common. They both require you to evaluate your situation, think ahead and make choices. The foundation of Kondo’s approach to decluttering is to choose the things that “spark joy”, and jettison the possessions that don’t. This particular focus on the things that make you happy is also a good way to manage how you spend your money.

If you are not making the progress on your goals that you want, you need to change something. To save more, you must spend less. For many, this simple truth keeps them from facing their financial situation and taking a step toward a more secure future. It simply doesn’t seem like any fun to spend less.

Yet many of us spend money on things that are not important to us. Takeout food eaten on the go, clothes that never get worn, TV channels that never get watched are all expenses that do not enrich our lives.

For most, your choice is not between doing what you love and financial security. It’s more about not doing what you don’t love. If you approach freeing up room in your monthly spending to save more with this in mind, you may find that it is a fun challenge to weed out those wasted expenses.

Some friends, Lisa and Candice, asked me to help them get started on a strategy to meet their financial goals. The two love music, and going out to dinner. This type of entertainment really made them happy. But they thought they would have to give it up if they wanted to make progress on their goals.

However, a review of their spending revealed some expenses that were neither necessary or making their lives better. For one, they were subscribed to a home security service, but in fact never actually engaged the alarm system. This is clearly an expense they could avoid. Other expenses that didn’t “spark joy” were daily coffee runs and takeout lunches that they consumed at their desks alone.

It may not be just the small stuff either. Maybe you have an expensive car, where a lower cost model would do just as well. Or you have extra room in your home that doesn’t make you happy just sitting there empty.

It may be that you can’t fully meet your savings goals by getting rid of expenses that don’t bring meaning to your life. You may need to get creative, and perhaps you ultimately do need to cut back on the things you love doing. But that doesn’t mean you have to stop doing them altogether. You won’t be successful long-term if your only tool is to deprive yourself of the things that are important to you.

Short of earning a bigger income, you only have so much money to go around. You have to make choices about what you do with it. Make them intentionally. Choose the things that bring you safety, security and joy, and give up the things that don’t. Make sure saving for your financial goals is one of those you keep.

Photo by Preslie Hirsch on Unsplash

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For a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to building your own financial plan, pick up my award winning book, Save Yourself; Your Guide to Saving for Retirement and Building Financial Security.  It is available on Amazon.

The Power of $5

We tend to overlook the power of small steps. We want a magic bullet to somehow make us thinner, richer and more successful. But much of life is simply putting one foot in front of the other in the direction we want to go. If your financial goals seem out of reach, consider what you could do with just $5 a day.

If you could find $5 a day to save instead of spend, by the end of the month you would have $150. By the end of the year, you could have saved $1,800 toward an emergency fund or expenses that would have otherwise gone on your credit card.

If you used your $150 to contribute to your company retirement savings plan, and your employer matches your contribution, you could turn it into $300 a month just like that. In a year you would have contributed a total of $3,600 toward retirement.

A recent CNBC article highlights a survey done by Creditcards.com. In it they found 42 percent of those aged 18 to 37 don’t know when or if they will ever be able to pay off their debt, and 20 percent expect to die with it. The average non-mortgage debt was $36,000.

You could use your $150 to make an extra payment on your debt. If you add $150 to the current minimum payment and make the same payment every month going forward, you could have $36,000 of debt completely paid off in as little as three years, depending on your interest rate. Of course that assumes you stop adding to it.

Once your debt is gone, instead of making payments on it, you could work toward your other financial goals, like saving more for retirement, saving for your children’s education and other things that are important to you. If your $36,000 of debt is credit card debt, the minimum payment is over $800. With your extra payment, it’s $950. That is a lot of money that could be going toward all your other goals.

Where could you find $5? Most of us spend money on things that aren’t important to us. Did you eat take out lunch at your desk? If so, you probably don’t even remember what you had, and you could have saved $5 by bringing your lunch from home.

You might be able to shave $5 a day, or $35 a week, from your grocery bill by changing the store where you shop or shopping more carefully so you have less food waste. There might be a combination of things you could do, like changing your phone plan, getting rid of the gym membership you don’t use, and turning down the heat when you aren’t home.

It doesn’t seem like much money. Just $5 a day. But the impact can be so powerful. You can have more financial security and your big financial goals are within reach. You only have to take the first step, even if its a small one. Whatever you do is progress, and you may be able to do more in the future. It may not be a magic bullet, but it will do the trick.

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For a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to building your own financial plan, pick up my award winning book, Save Yourself; Your Guide to Saving for Retirement and Building Financial Security.  It is available on Amazon.

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How to Clean Up Your Financial Junk Drawer

Today’s post comes from guest writer Aiden White.
Aiden is a San Francisco based writer. Discussion and debates on financial and political subjects are her forte. Being a debt fighter in her personal life, her goal is to share innovative thoughts and knowledge in the debt communities. Get in touch with her at aidenwhitejoe@gmail.com.

What’s in your financial junk drawer? Is it incomplete goals from 2018? Or could it be that you are not coming clean with your partner on some financial issue? Like the junk drawer in your kitchen, you may be reluctant to look at what is lurking in there. But to be successful in reaching your goals you have to sort through it.

Incomplete Financial Goals

It’s easy to say you want to do something, but it’s harder to commit to it. Saving more money or reducing debt are common New Year’s resolutions, but if you weren’t successful in achieving your goals in 2018, it could be that you didn’t put enough specificity around them. Here are a few common goals and how to define them in a way that will motivate you.

Build an emergency fund

An emergency fund is savings that will help you in the event of a personal financial crisis such as the loss of a job, a prolonged illness or an unexpected major expense. Your emergency fund should be enough to cover at least three months of basic living expenses. Yours may need to be bigger depending on your circumstances.

This is your top priority. To help you achieve it, define how much you need to save and determine exactly what you will do to save it. For example, you might decide to get a jump on your savings by dedicating your next bonus or tax refund to it. You might decide to cut out restaurant trips until your emergency fund is in place.

Set milestones. Determine what you will save each month, have saved in six months, etc., and when you will complete your emergency fund. Whatever your strategy, you will be more likely to achieve your goal if you have one.

Get out of debt

Debt creates financial insecurity. With debt, your emergency fund needs to be larger than it otherwise would need to be, and you are more prone to a financial disaster.

Consider consolidating high-interest credit card debt or multiple credit cards to a 0% APR balance transfer card. You may also be able to consolidate other unsecured debt like payday loans, utility bills, medical bills, personal loans, etc.

Once your debt is consolidated and you are down to your lowest interest rate possible, you can pay down your debt using a strategy such as the debt snowball. In this strategy you make only the minimum payment required on all your loans except the smallest one. Pay as much as you can on that one. Once that is paid off, take the full monthly payment you were making on the smallest loan and combine it with the minimum payment on the next smallest loan. Continue through the remaining obligations.

As with your emergency fund, you’ll need a strategy for raising the money to make extra payments on your debt. Determine what you will do differently as part of setting your goal.

Create and follow a budget plan

A recent survey revealed that only 32 percent of people make a proper financial budget. Your budget is your strategy for achieving your goals.

If you need guidelines to get started, experts suggest a 50/20/30 rule. 50 percent of your money should be used for essential spending (rent, transportation, utilities), 20 percent should go towards completing personal financial goals (saving and paying off debt), and the remaining 30 percent could be used for discretionary expenses.

Save for your retirement

Supporting yourself in retirement takes a lot of money. To make it as painless as possible, you need to start saving for it as soon as you can. A recent survey from Provision Living revealed that 43% of millennials have $5,000 or less in savings for retirement.

Start by taking advantage of your employer sponsored retirement plan, especially if they offer to match your contributions. The automatic contributions will make saving easier for you. If your employer doesn’t offer a retirement savings plan, open a Roth IRA. You can make those contributions automatically as well by having your employer make a direct deposit from your pay to your IRA account.

Hidden financial secrets

According to creditcards.com, one in twenty people in a serious relationship have a secret bank or credit card account. Whether you’re embarrassed by a purchase you made or you’re keeping a slush fund so you can spend money without discussing it with your partner, this could be considered financial infidelity.

The problem is that many of us still hesitate to talk about money with anyone, even with the person whom we love the most. Keeping financial secrets can ruin your relationship as well as create grave financial problems. This corner of your junk drawer may be hard to face, but you must for the health of your relationship and your finances.

That financial junk drawer is causing you stress. Unfinished business and unrevealed secrets will stay on your mind until you resolve them. Perhaps this year’s resolution should be to get rid of the junk drawer all together.



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Save Yourself is now available on Amazon




Your Emergency Fund Needs to be Your Number One Goal

The current government shut down highlights a significant problem in the United States. No, I’m not talking about the lack of political will in congress to tackle even the most mundane of tasks, though that certainly is a problem. I’m talking about the pervasive financial fragility of Americans.

Some 800,000 federal employees face at least a delay in getting paid, if not the full loss of at least one paycheck. Many will find it difficult to make ends meet and will struggle to catch up on their bills even after they start getting paid again. Social media posts under #shutdownstories are heartbreaking.

But financial insecurity goes beyond those impacted by the shut down. In a report released last May, the Federal Reserve found that even in our currently strong economy, four in ten Americans would have difficulty coming up with $400 to cover an unexpected expense without resorting to selling something or going into debt. The lack of savings cuts across income brackets.

Anyone who is working for pay is vulnerable to the loss of a paycheck. Even in a good economy, people get laid off, and there is a surprisingly high probability that you will not be able to work due to an injury or illness at some point during your career.

To avoid having one of these setbacks become a financial disaster, you need an emergency fund.

If you do not currently have at least three months of basic living expenses saved outside your retirement plan, building that level of savings needs to be your top priority. It is more important than saving for anything else.

  • If you are currently saving in your retirement plan, but don’t have an emergency fund, stop your contributions now. Even if your employer matches, stop. Focus every extra dollar on building an emergency fund.
  • If you are working on paying down your debt, stop all but the minimum payments. Yes, you will rack up extra interest charges, but once your emergency fund is in place, you will be far less likely to add to your debt in the future.
  • Cut your spending to the bone, and/or consider selling something to get a jump start on your emergency fund. The foundation of your financial security is dependent on you being able to survive a short time out of work.

Once you’ve established a minimum emergency fund, you can resume your progress toward your other financial goals. Your emergency fund is a one and done kind of goal. Once it’s in place you don’t need to keep adding to it, unless you use it for the emergency it’s there for or your basic living expenses increase.

Too many Americans are just the loss of a paycheck away from financial disaster. The government’s shut down illustrates the vulnerability of even those with a supposedly good job. If you don’t have enough money saved to survive a few months without pay, your top priority is to establish an emergency fund.

Save Yourself” is now available on Amazon

Header photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

It’s Here!

Thank you to everyone who has followed my posts for the last few years. I am extremely excited to announce that my book is now available on Amazon!

Save Yourself is a comprehensive guide to saving for retirement and shoring up your financial security so you can do whatever it is you want. Through the stories of real people, it shows you exactly how you can make the changes that will allow you to save for a long and secure retirement so that you don’t need to work for pay. In addition, it covers other aspects of true financial security, giving you peace of mind throughout your life.

Early reviews are very positive. Here’s one that a reader was kind enough to post on Amazon.

The Save Yourself guide to retirement planning justifies the need to take control of your financial security with meticulous statistical research and lays out the step-by-step plan to reduce debt, budget and achieve financial independence. If you are putting planning off, author Grandstaff’s remark that “The monthly savings requirement more than doubles for every ten years you delay” is a sobering statement to prompt action to read her work and get started today.”

Happy reading! Reviews are very important to help other readers find the book, so please post one back at the same Amazon page. Again thank you for your kind attention, and have a wonderful holiday season.

On The First Day of Christmas…

Last year, I posted this financial redo of the classic 12 Days of Christmas. My daughter and I actually sang it in a video, which was fun. This year I’ll spare you that. If you’d like to see it, you can find it in last year’s post. Here’s wishing you love and joy and true financial security!


On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me a fund for emergencies

On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me a long-term care policy, a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, a pledge to be mortgage free, a long-term care policy, a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

Merry Christmas everyone!

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Three Tips to Save at the Grocery Store

The holiday season is a time for entertaining. Whether you’re having folks over to your house, or making a dish to take to someone else’s, this time of year your grocery bill can be eye popping. Here are a few tips to help you save some money at the grocery store.

Change Where You Shop

There can be a large disparity in the prices that grocery stores charge. There are the high-end stores like Whole Foods, there are discount grocers, and several in between. Our local news outlet here in Portland did a comparison of seven chains in the metro area on a list of five common grocery items. There was a difference of 30 percent between the highest-priced store and the lowest-priced store.

The prospect of saving almost a third on your grocery bill is an incentive to at least check out your alternatives. Even if you are shopping organic or have other specialty food requirements, you may be surprised at the selection offered by the lower-cost grocery stores.

Avoid Paying for Packaging

Another grocery store savings trick is to avoid paying for packaging. The more that goes into making food portable and presentable, the more it costs. If you can slice it, divide it, or put it in your own container, you will save. In many cases, just a few extra minutes of your time can give you all the advantages offered by the packaged products and save you lots of money. The following table compares a few packaged food items to their unpackaged alternatives.

PrepackagedUnpackaged
Bottled ice tea
(6 pack)
$9.89Home-brewed
ice tea (same volume)
$1.00
Steel-cut oatmeal
(24 oz package)
$3.00Bulk steel-cut oats 
(24 oz)
$0.60
GoGo squeeZ
applesauce (12 pack)
$8.79Applesauce
(Same volume)
$3.84
McCormick ground
cinnamon (2.4 oz)
$2.37Bulk cinnamon
(2.4 oz)
$0.58
Sliced apples
(multipack, 10 oz total)
$4.49Apples (10 oz)$2.18

Shopping the Sales

The final tool for squeezing every last penny out of your grocery store visit is couponing and shopping the sales. Carrie Rocha manages a website, www.pocketyourdollars.com, with a coupon database and currently running deals at a variety of national chain stores. She also wrote the book Pocket YourDollars: 5 Attitude Changes That Will Help You Pay Down Debt, Avoid FinancialStress, and Keep More of What You Make. She advocates shopping the sales and claims that you can shave 30 to 40 percent off your grocery bill if you buy what you use when it is on sale instead of when you need it.

This time of year, it’s easy for your grocery bill to get out of hand. But with a little planning and a rethink of how and where you buy your food, there are big savings to be had.


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Gratitude Isn’t Just for Thanksgiving

This week of Thanksgiving is a good time to reflect on what we’re grateful for. But gratitude is something we should be practicing all year. Instead of “keep the spirit of Christmas in your hearts all year long”, maybe the saying should be “keep gratitude in your hearts all year long.”

In this age of steady information on social media about your friends’ vacations and constant advertising for the latest new gizmos, it’s easy to focus on the things you feel you’re missing out on. But for your mental and financial health, a focus on working toward your goals and all the good things you already have would be better.

In The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz, Dr. Schwartz talked about how rising incomes in the US have had little impact on our individual happiness. The reason is two-fold. Reason one is that we tend to adapt to new situations quickly. While buying something new gives us a dose of pleasure, we quickly come to take our new thing for granted.

The second reason is that our expectations rise. We have an idea of how someone in our income bracket should be living. We see how our Facebook friends and colleagues are living and believe we should have the same lifestyle.

Unfortunately, the lifestyle we think we should have may be based on inaccurate information. After all, we really don’t know much about anyone’s financial situation but our own, and assuming we should be living like someone else doesn’t factor in how that other person is making ends meet or whether they have the same financial goals.

If instead you focus your attention on meeting your own goals and appreciating what you already have, you can derive pleasure from your achievements and knowing how fortunate you are.

In the words of DavidSteindl-Rast, “Happiness doesn’t make us grateful. Gratitude makes us happy.”

The next time you pull on an old sweater, think of all the fun times you had while wearing it. Or when you sit in your car, think of all the trips you’ve taken in it, or the songs you sang with your kids in it. When you see your friend’s exotic vacation photos on Instagram, be happy for them, and remember all the things you loved about the last trip you took.

It’s human nature to seek out new things and to compare ourselves to those around us. Our culture seems to have let these instincts run amok. It’s easy to get caught up in the chase for more material possessions and ever escalating lifestyles. But if you pause for a moment, once in a while, and think about how good your life already is, you may find that you have all that you need, and for this you can be grateful.

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Five Tips to Keep the Holiday Buying Frenzy From Becoming Post Holiday Clutter

Our big spending season is looming just around the corner. According to the National Retail Federation, Americans are expected to spend more than $1,000 per household this holiday season. There are few that don’t love to give as well as get a gift. But before you head off to do your holiday shopping, consider what you and your loved ones will do with all the stuff you buy.

Americans have too much stuff. Evidence that we have too much stuff lies in data on the Self Storage industry. In 2017, there was seven square feet of storage space for every man, woman, and child in America, and 90 percent of it was in use.

The industry expects the need to store stuff to continue to rise. Spending to build more space in 2017 was almost double what was spent in 2016. In an article on InvestorManagementServices.com, there was little concern there would be a drop in demand any time soon.

A 2015 survey done by Gladiator Garage Works, a firm that makes organizational systems for garages, found that one in four households could not get a car into their garage due to all the stuff that’s in there. Not only are the garages full, but the closets, attics, and basements are too.

Holiday shopping has the ability to cloud our judgement. We get caught up in the festivity, the pressure, and even the competition of buying things. And we are the perfect consumers. We have a basic need for novelty and new experiences. That is one of the reasons we love Christmas so much. Unfortunately, many of the things we buy will wind up relegated to the closet, then the garage, and for too many, finally the storage unit.

When your gifts go unused, not only has your money been wasted, but you are also contributing to the stress of those who receive your gifts. Clutter has a negative impact on mental health. It has been linked to depression and fatigue, overeating, and isolation.

Here are a few tips to help avoid wasting money and contributing to your receivers pile of stuff this holiday season.

  • Don’t go shopping looking for inspiration. Know what you will buy before you go and have a budget for each person on your list.
  • Coordinate your gift giving with family members. Check in with others to get a good idea of what each person on your list needs or has really had their eye on.
  • Consider pairing at least adult family members, so each one is only buying and receiving one gift.
  • To cut down on children’s holiday overload, consider making a contribution to a college fund, instead of buying toys or clothes.
  • If you’re at a loss for what to give, make it consumable. Home baked goodies rarely go to waste and won’t be stored.

We look forward to the holidays every year. But the buying frenzy that comes with them can be a waste. Too much of what is bought will wind up as stuff that needs to be stored when the excitement wears off. So, this year, take a more thoughtful approach to gift buying. Buy fewer gifts and make them count. You’ll save money and your gifts will be truly valued.

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The Key to Following Through on Your Good Intentions

Do you find it hard to follow through with your intentions? Whether it’s sticking to a budget or signing up for your company retirement plan, it’s easy to get off track. Everyone is busy, and your good intentions may fall victim to life’s frenetic pace. The key to following through with all you want to accomplish is to have a plan.

Of course you need a plan to achieve the big goals in your life. But you also need a plan to just get through your day. Simply knowing what you will do will make your life easier.

Say that you intend to cut back on eating out so you will have some extra money to save for your emergency fund. After a long day at work, you’re tired and hungry. Instead of making something from the groceries you have at home, you head off to the local Thai restaurant. You weren’t planning to go out to dinner. But in the moment it just seemed easier.

Though you have groceries at home, if you don’t know specifically what you will do with them, you have to decide what to cook under stress. The decision making process takes energy you simply don’t have, so your good intentions go out the window.

Scientists have found that under stress an enzyme attacks a synaptic regulatory molecule in the brain. As a result, fewer neural connections are made, and we think less clearly. We are physically less able to make good decisions. Our judgment in these circumstances is literally impaired.

The key to sticking with your good intentions is to not have to make a decision when your synapses are under attack. Just knowing what you will do will help you follow through. If you know exactly what you will make for dinner, it’s easier to carry out that plan than it is to decide when you’re tired and hungry. The following example illustrates why a plan works.

Plan No Plan
Planned to make meat loaf, green beans and steamed potatoes for dinner Check refrigerator for options
All ingredients on hand and defrosted Nothing is thawed, so need to wait for meat to defrost in the microwave. Choose ground turkey
Mix ingredients for meat loaf and put in the oven Out of eggs, so meat loaf is out – opt for turkey burgers
Steam green beans and potatoes in microwave No buns. Burgers are out, maybe pasta
Serve dinner What else do I have?

It’s the figuring it out that drains you, not the doing. You could make that meat loaf in your sleep. But without a plan, it’s no wonder you would choose to go out for dinner.

Simply planning what you will do will help you carry out all of your good intentions. If you’ve been meaning to sign up for your retirement plan or even just call your mother, but you are always too busy, try putting it on your calendar on a specific time and day. It  will substantially increase the likelihood that you will actually do it.

If you are committed to following through on your intentions, make a plan.  If you know specifically what you will do and when you will do it, you are much more likely to follow through. Your plan eliminates the need to make a decision, which if made at the last moment, may not be a good one.

Which of your good intentions could use a plan? Leave me a comment.

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